Part of this walking tour is in the theater district.

https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!4v1537297895154!6m8!1m7!1sgTVm75wDT_Ds6w1ZxaprfQ!2m2!1d40.7811866728013!2d-73.94773902671807!3f275.8681!4f0!5f0.7820865974627469

It’s no secret that if you walk anywhere in New York, some interesting and unusual sight, sound and site will greet you. Midtown, no matter how familiar, always offers up a new view or two. For instance, did you know there was a lobster cart pop-up in front of Oceana, a nice dining establishment in […]

via Gadding about — SidewalkSuperBlog

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Gadding about — SidewalkSuperBlog

via The magic that is a Paul Taylor Dance

It is a great loss and a sadness to hear that Paul Taylor has died at the age of 88 on August 28, 2018. His works leave us a delightful legacy.1TrusanvoecGoodePrintemps

The magic that is a Paul Taylor Dance

Posted in AmericanSongbook, Anderson Twins, Hoagy Carmichael, Irving Berlin, jazz, Jerome Kern, Jimmy Van Heusen, Songbook, The Anderson Twins

Come along and hear the “Songbook Summit”

ATJ_SONGBOOK 11x17 POSTER JPEGOften as not, a gimmick can be the framework that showcases a great talent, particularly when it’s the hook for an act that’s really got the goods.

For the saxophone duo, Peter and Will Anderson, the trick that underscores their accomplishments is that they are twins, with Peter on the tenor and soprano sax (plus clarinet) and Will on the alto, the clarinet and the flute.

This summer they will head up a 2018 Songbook Summit at Symphony Space where they will be joined by Molly Ryan (vocals), Tarlo Hammer or Steve Ash (piano), Clovis Nicholas (accoustic bass) and Philip Stewart (drums). (NB there was a 2017 Summit as well.)

There is no denying the charm the brothers Anderson bring to their curaitons. The schedule for the jazz events gives us, first up, Irving Berlin from August 7 through 12; next Jerome Kern is featured from the 14th through the 19th. The fellas and their sextet pay their respects to Hoagy Carmichael from August 21st through the 26th, and Jimmy Van Heusen from August 28th through September 2nd.

For tickets and information visit the Symphony Space site, and the Anderson twins home page.

 

 

Watching movies about the civil war is a fraught experience. Whose side am I on? Which side is represented by Jimmy Stewart when he picks up his gun? Can we admire the artistry with which DW Griffiths gives the KKK a valiant star turn? Does irony excuse the racial politics when a mixed-race band of […]

via Between delight and dismay — Take Note

Between delight and dismay — Take Note

via It’s the 4th of July: Who are you?

1.Hamilton1499rR Lin-Manuel Miranda and the company of Hamilton
Lin-Manuel Miranda and the company of Hamilton. Photo © Joan Marcus

The ideals of justice and equality that made America what it was are being severely tried. We cannot wear the costume of freedom if we give up our rights and freedoms.

Our playwrights and story-tellers try to steer us to the right path. Who will prevail in the struggle for America’s heritage? Our legacy is at stake.

It’s the 4th of July: Who are you?

Posted in #dystopia, dysfunction, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2012, Festival Fringe-bound and Festival Fringe-found, fringe worthy, off Broadway, offbeat work

What’s up?

1.image
Boomerang Theatre Company’s playbill art.

Inspiration comes in serendipitous doses.

That at least is the case for The Mushroom Cure by Adam Strauss and developed and directed by Jonathan Libman. In his Fringe Fesitval winner (2016 Overall Excellence for a Solo Performance,) Strauss recounts his attempts to self-medicate his crippling OCD.  Fittingly for a solo show that explores the mental health benefits of hallucigenic fungi, The Mushroom Cure is simultaneously being performed in the East Village (at Theatre 80 St. Mark’s), and in Berkeley and (fleetingly) in LA. Sponsorship for the productions is provided by The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a psychedelic research and advocacy organization.

Smith Street Stage is putting on the greatest summer comedy in the repertoire at The Actors Fund Arts Center in Brooklyn.  A Midsummer Night’s Dream, as directed by Jonathan Hopkins, is transported to our New York, looking at the magic in our home town in the spirit of Shakespeare.

There is more Shakespeare on offer, of course, this summer; as is its custom. the Public gives us Shakespeare in the Park, but this year, Boomerang Theatre Company is puttng on Twelfth Night (or What You Will), directed by Sara Thigpen, on the lawn in Central Park. Be grateful to the Bard as Twelfth Night is a tonic for our times.

Posted in dark comedy drama, Gingold Theatrical Group, Inspiration, long running Broadway musical, Long running musical, Musical drama, musicals and dramas, The Long Running AMERICAN Musical

Windy city

ChicagoGTG Everything has an origin story, and Chicago, The Musical, has one in this 1926 play.  Maurine Dallas Watkins provided the inspiration for the show that’s been running on Broadway since forever. Like it’s lead characters, Chicago had a rocky start, opening June 3, 1975 and closing two years later on August 27, 1977; it reopened in revival in November of that year in the West End and then hit Broadway with a flair. Ann Reinking, using the Fosse style, choreographed the revival under Walter Bobbie’s direction to resounding success.

Watkins wrote Chicago for a class assignment at the Yale School of Drama. It, too, went on to have a resounding success, not least because it provided the story for the musical. The story of Roxie Hart and her fellow inmates also inspired a 1927 film named Chicago and in 1942 one named after our anti-heroine. Watkins’ version of her the tale was based on her coverage on the crime beat of the Chicago Tribune, and opened on Broadway in 1926, where it lasted for just 172 performances, under the direction of George Abbott. It’s after-life is a matter of record.

The Gingold Theatrical Group (GTG) will perform the play that spurred the famous Broadway hit on Monday, July 23rd at Symphony Space at 7pm.