Posted in Children's show, holiday event, kid-friendly, Solomon Guggenheim, Works & Process

Peter and his symphony

In the ’80s I relished attending rehearsals at Tanglewood, not just for the great al fresco setting, but also for thre feeling that I was watching the music unfold. Seeing artists develop and  think through a work puts the creative process in a different perspective.

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The Guggenheim, a great venue on its own, hosts a series called Works & Process, which offers an insider view. Sometimes it’s ballets in development, sometimes dramas, such as Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s The Fundamentals by Erika Sheffer this past September.

1-bbu3g 2-_7909-1-draggedIn December, it’s become a tradition at the Museum to have Isaac Mizrahi lead you and your tots (5-years +) through a narration of Peter & The Wolf. In fact, the renowned fashion designer has been narrating Sergei Prokofiev’s classic tale for the past ten years. After so many years, this is more of a “Works” than a “Process,” sure to entertain and amuse.

Peter is a defiant boy, who claims “boys like me are not afraid…” as he risks an encounter with the wolf. In this production Brad Lubman conducts Ensemble Signal, and a cast performs choreography by John Heginbotham to bring the lovely 30-minute story to life. Peter & The Wolf will perform on December 3, 4, 10, 11, 2:30 pm and 4 pm and on December 9, 5 pm and 6:30 pm.

For tickets and information, visit the Guggenheim website.

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Posted in drama, family drama, love story, Roundabout Theatre Company, theater

Boom boom boom

Love Love Love OFF BROADWAYDRAMA LAURA PELS THEATRE 111 W. 46TH S., NEW YORK, NY 10036 Sparked in the haze of the 60s, Love Love Love explores a relationship charred by today's brutal reality, paranoia and passion. Starring: Richard Armitage, Alex Hurt, Zoe Kazan, Ben Rosenfield, Amy Ryan Director: Michael Mayer PLAYWRIGHT: MIKE BARTLETT
Love Love Love Richard Armitage, Amy Ryan, and Alex Hurt Director btMichael Mayer; Play by Mike Bartlett Photo by Joan Marcus
Love Love Love OFF BROADWAYDRAMA LAURA PELS THEATRE 111 W. 46TH S., NEW YORK, NY 10036 Sparked in the haze of the 60s, Love Love Love explores a relationship charred by today's brutal reality, paranoia and passion. Starring: Richard Armitage, Alex Hurt, Zoe Kazan, Ben Rosenfield, Amy Ryan Director: Michael Mayer PLAYWRIGHT: MIKE BARTLETT
Love Love Love Richard Armitage, Amy Ryan, Ben Rosenfield and, Zoe Kazan. Photo by Joan Marcus

One of the many pleasures of theater is when the familiar turns into the unexpected.

When there’s Beatles’ songs, and a character starts rolling a joint, it’s clearly shorthand for the ’60s. And where do we go from the youthful exuberance of that era?

Playwright Mike Bartlett paints an unsentimental portrait of the generation that emerged from the summer of love. Can the disruption promised by the3 enthusiasms of the young be delivered?

Love Love Love OFF BROADWAYDRAMA LAURA PELS THEATRE 111 W. 46TH S., NEW YORK, NY 10036 Sparked in the haze of the 60s, Love Love Love explores a relationship charred by today's brutal reality, paranoia and passion. Starring: Richard Armitage, Alex Hurt, Zoe Kazan, Ben Rosenfield, Amy Ryan Director: Michael Mayer PLAYWRIGHT: MIKE BARTLETT
Richard Armitage, and Amy Ryan in a scene from Love Love Love. Photo by Joan Marcus.
Love Love Love OFF BROADWAYDRAMA LAURA PELS THEATRE 111 W. 46TH S., NEW YORK, NY 10036 Sparked in the haze of the 60s, Love Love Love explores a relationship charred by today's brutal reality, paranoia and passion. Starring: Richard Armitage, Alex Hurt, Zoe Kazan, Ben Rosenfield, Amy Ryan Director: Michael Mayer PLAYWRIGHT: MIKE BARTLETT
A scene from Love Love Love with Richard Armitage and Amy Ryan. Photo by Joan Marcus.

Love, Love, Love at Roundabout’s Laura Pels Theatre through December 18th, looks at what happens when the pendulum moves and years pass.

While Henry (Alex Hurt) fancies Sandra (Amy Ryan), his brother Ken (Richard Armitage) is the one she hones in on. Ken is at Oxford as she is, and Henry is just a working bloke. At 19, Sandra knows what she wants, weed and freedom.

Twenty years on, the revolutionary road has led Ken and Sandra to a home in the suburbs with two teenage kids, Jamie (Ben Rosenfield) and Rose (Zoe Kazan). Through it all, Ken and Sandra, still cheerful, seem unfazed by time and change. How have their offspring fared?

Boomers, take note, we might not have succeeded in saving the planet.

Walk down the path with Love, Love, Love to its clear-eyed and unflattering conclusion. It will prove most rewarding. We are always impressed by what Roundabout offers visually in its off-Broadway productions, and the sets by Derek McLane and time-inspired costuming by Susan Hilferty are no exception.

Michael Meyer deftly directs his flawless ensemble in Love, Love, Love. Richard Armitage and Amy Ryan stand out for their

Posted in adaptation, dark drama, David Harrower, Ibsen, Ibsen adaptation, renowned playwright, The Pearl Theatre Company

Majority rule

It rarely happens when I find myself speechless.

David Harrower’s adaptation of Public Enemy, at the Pearl Theater through November 6th, leaves me gob-smacked as our midwestern friends might say.

Populism has a way of drowning out reason, and majority rule can have unwelcome consequences. Ibsen knew this when he created An Enemy of the People, translated by Charlotte Barslund for Harrower’s re-imaging as Public Enemy.

Crowd mentality

The man of principle, Ibsen says, stands alone while the majority is lulled into serving the self-interests of the powerful. And that man, the individual, who stands alone is “the strongest man.”

Dr. Stockmann (Jimonn Cole) stands alone, of course. Stockmann’s insistence that he has discovered that the Baths which are a tourist attraction for their little burg are a health hazard threatens the town’s livelihood and prosperity. He’s alienated everyone, except his wife Katrine (Nilaja Sun) and daughter, Petra (Arielle Goldman) who both acknowledge his genius. The rest of the town, represented by his brother, Peter, the Mayor (Giuseppe Jones), the printer and small businessman, Aslasken (John Keating), the hypocritical newspaper men, Billing (Alex Purcell) and Hovstad (Robbie Tann), all turn against him.His father-in-law, Kiil (Dominic Cuskern) is especially angry since it looks like his tannery has caused the pollution.

Harrower (Good With People, Blackbird, A Slow Air) is no stranger to moral uncertainties and slippery slopes. His adaptation of Ibsen is lean and to the point. The text is thought-provoking, and anything but reassuring. Earlier productions of Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People, like the one at MTC several seasons back, were equally disheartening.

Standing out in this fine cast, Cole plays Stockmann’s as humbly arrogant with a fine subtlety. The Pearl’s Artistic Director, Hal Brooks directs the ensemble with a light touch, playing on both the tragedy and humor in Public Enemy.

For tickets and more information, please visit The Pearl website.

 

Posted in adaptation, anticipation, Chekhov, Chekhov interpretations, drama, feminism, Ibsen, Ibsen adaptation, Ophelia Theatre Group, Roundabout Theatre Company, The Pearl Theatre Company

Classics anew

opheliaMankind has had the urge to tell its stories since time immemorial. The stories told in different voices all have universal themes. Theatrical history has a long time-line.

Warping that time-line is also a stage-borne tradition. Retelling Antigone’s
tale, as Ivo Van Hove did at BAM last year, for instance, is one way to honor
theatre’s lineage.

Stephen Karam has been charged with recharging Chekhov’s classic Cherry
Orchard for the Roundabout this season. David Harrower is reworking Ibsen’s
An Enemy of the People into Public Enemy, currently playing through
November 6th over at the Pearl.

Drama poses a problem, offers solutions and catharsis. To that end, Kelly
McCready, an actress and director we recently saw at the Mint in The New Morality ,
has taken on Hedda Gabler. Ms McCready, who has re-imagined this Ibsen and is directing, at the Ophelia Theatre Group , starting on October 27th and running through
November 19th, feels that Hedda is too often maligned. She has cut the play
to 80 intermission-less minutes, and taken Hedda’s side, as an advocate and a
friend. And why not? Hedda should be a feminist hero.

To quote Ms McCready, “This production seeks to throw out preconceptions of
the play and the character herself. This Hedda is just a woman who tries to
make her new life and relationship with Tesman work, but she can’t combat
her circumstances and the expectations placed on her because she’s a woman.
She can’t change any of that.”

BTW, the Ophelia Theatre Group is in Astoria, and Ms McCready also
advocates for the “growing arts community” in this outer borough location.
She says, “Astoria has even earned the nickname “Actoria” in recent years, but
it’s obviously difficult to get audiences to venture far from Manhattan. And
that means people are missing out.”

The tickets for Hedda Gabler are available here; they are gently priced at $18 which should drag some of you from Manhattan to the wilds of, we might point out, nearby Astoria.

In another vein of adaptation altogether is David Stallings’ Anais Nin Goes to Hell, at The Theater at the 14th Street Y from October 14th through the 29th, which takes a comedic turn but looks at feminist icons. Imagine Andromeda, Heloise, Joan of Arc, Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Ophelia, Karen Carpenter and of course Anaïs Nin, all trapped together in the afterlife. The play was a hit in the 2008 Fringe Festival, and is being re-staged here under the direction of Antonio Miniño.