Posted in riff

What’s in a like? — Take Note

or in a like it alot? Our household has a favorite film which we have now watched dozens of times, and that fact has me wondering why? Why that particular film? We have a couple of other must-sees, like Connie and Carla, or Barefoot in The Park, or Moonstruck too. What draws us to these […]

What’s in a like? — Take Note
Posted in based on a movie, classic, musical, musicals, Rodgers and Hammerstein

Toot toot Tootsie, don't cry!

thanks to Cafe Press for the t-shirt logo.

Before he was Mrs. Doubtfire, he was a very personable Charlie Chaplin. Rob McClure is said to be doing wonders with this new musical transferring from a Seatlle run in 2020, just as he did marvels in the earlier Chaplin, The Musical.

McClure’s Scottish nanny has taken over for Santino Fontana’s Tootsie which is set to end its run on January 5th in the category of older women impersonations.

We’ll have to wait til March to see Wayne and Karey Kirkpatrick’s Mrs. Doubtfire, another plucked from the screen project. (Karey Kirkpatrick and John O’Farell who collaborated on the book, here, along with Wayne Kirkpatrick, also were responsible for a favorite of ours, Something Rotten!, a Tony-“loser” from 2015.)

I am playing a replacement game with you in this post, so let’s take Oklahoma, closing on January 19th, and go to Ove Van Hove’s de-construction of another classic from the same canon, West Side Story. Currently in previews, it opens on February 6th. This musical has a revised book and some of the music as I understand it, has been cut. There is also new choreography, replacing Jerome Robbins’ original, by Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker. Intriguing!

Posted in comedy, dance, drama, theater

Articulated

ONE GREEN BOTTLE, photo by Kishin Shinoyama,

It is sometimes harder to put a concept better expressed in the physical, into words.

I admit that it can be difficult for a critic to articulate what s/he sees presented on the stage. Some things are visceral. This is particularly true of dance where emotion and meaning are conveyed in gestures, movement and context. It also often applies to experimental theatre which tends towards the cerebral.

Katie Workum and her collaborators want to communicate about their work, The Door’s Unlocked in exclusionary descriptives. This is how the work is described:
“Let’s be clear:
This is not a dance piece. 
This is a conjuring inside a temporariness. 
This is connecting the dancers with the dance. 
This is a negotiation of our togetherness.  
This is entering the unknown without demanding to know. “

She and her collective, the eponymously named Katie Workum Dance, will perform the multi-platformed piece at Foley Gallery at 59 Orchard Street; they expect that it will change with each iteration and audience to which it is presented, from February 3 through 9.

In speaking of the experimental in theater, I am always referencing LaMaMa as a touchstone. So, I am glad to be able to include in this posting a little something of what they will be up to in the new year.

La MaMa, in association with Tokyo Metropolitan Theatre and NODA・MAP, presents the U.S. Premiere of One Green Bottle from February 29 through March 8, 2020 at The Ellen Stewart Theatre, La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club. One Green Bottle is an absurdist work in which gender is bent, and our societal foibles, from consumerism to selfie-addiction, is explored.

LaMaMa may have been at the forefront of theatrical happenings, of course, but all theatre is about performance, sentiment and interaction. What is on stage is always a happening.

ABTC, Echoes in the Garden (reading) © Basil Rodericks 2019

The 1st Origin Irish Festival is in its 12th season of competition., beginning on January 7th and running through February 3rd. The festival is a highly curated event, devoted to producing the plays of contemporary Irish playwrights from around the world with a total of 15 productions being presented in venues all over NYC. During the Closing Night Ceremony on Monday, February 3rd, the Best of Festival Awards will be handed out.

A multi-generational drama, Echoes in the Garden, is on offer at The Chain Theatre this March 11th through 29th. The world premiere of Ross G. Hewitt’s new play about family, grief and obligation is producted by American Bard Theater Company and directed by Aimee Todoroff.

Also at The Chain, beginning on February 7th and running through the 22nd is another premiere, Chasing the River. Written by Jean Dobie Giebel and directed by Ella Jane New, Chasing the River depends on memory and its intersection with PTSD to tell its tale of second chances, survival and the healing power of love.