Posted in 2017 Tony Nominations, DC politics, drama, drama based on real events, historical drama, historical musical drama, historically-based musical, Ibsen, Ibsen adaptation, Kristen Childs, Playwright, Musical drama, political drama, politically inspired, politics, Shakespeare, Shakespeare in the Park, The Tony Awards, Tony, Tony Awards

Tidbits, tall tales, and short truths

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From The Wheelhouse Theatre’s production of An Enemy of the People, playing through June 24th. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

Theatricality is a fraught concept. It can just be dramatic and thought-provoking, or it can be over-the-top, dramatic and thought-provoking. Kristen Childs has written a musical that is theatrical to the nth degree. Bella: An American Tall Tale also gives us a little slice of African-American history mixed in with the fable.

In other theatrical news, not as dramatic, I believe that Cynthia Nixon and Laurie Metcalf ruined my perfect record of being wrong on the Tonys. Ah well, maybe next year.
 
Politics and theater are getting a bad rep. Actually politics and their practitioners have had a reputation for honesty meaning any means that is necessary, aka I’ll lie if I have to, and theater has always been a forum for exposing truths. Ms. Nixon stirred the political pot a tiny bit in her acceptance speech at the 2017 Tony Awards Ceremonies. Now, it is the mixing of politics into theater that has caused quite the controversy (see what is happening with The Public’s Julius Caesar for instance.) It is unwarranted. Art is meant to comment on our realities.
At any rate, one of those realities, Lost and Guided, a play by Irene Kapustina about Syrian refuges in their own words, is on view at Conrad Fischer and The Angle Project, at Under St Marks (94 St. Marks Place, from August 3 through 27th. For tickets, click here.
A similar but perhaps more intitmate project is The Play Company’s Oh My Sweet Land another look at the Syrian refuge crisis. The play is due to launch this fall in private homes and communal spaces where people have been invited to host this  multi-sensory experience. Those wishing to participate by providing a venue can do so by filling out the questionnaire here. Nadine Malouf stars, perhaps in your own kitchen, in Oh My Sweet Land, a play developed by Amir Nizar Zuabi with German-Syrian actor Corinne Jaber.
Shakespeare wrote plays reflecting timely events, for his time and all times. This may explain why The Public is in such hot water over their production of Julius Caesar. The brouhaha, perhaps like the staging, is way out of proportion. In Measure for Measure, Shakespeare also explores issues to do with power and justice. Theatre for a New Audience is presenting a new modernized staging by Simon Godwin from June 17th through July 16th. Tickets for this show which will be held at Polansky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn are available at TFANA’s website.
Henrik Ibsen had his own take on both the personal and the political. For instnace, Ibsen’s drama, An Enemy of the People is a play about populism and its discontents.
An Enemy of the People comes to us from the Wheelhouse Theater Company under the direction of Jeff Wise, at the Gene Frankel Theater, beginning June 9th and running through June 24th is conceived as a meditation on the “tyranny of the majority.”
Following on the success of Ibsen’s feminist tale as revisited by Lucas Hnath in A Doll’s House, Part 2, see the US Premiere of Victoria Benedictsson’s 1887 Swedish original, The Enchantment in a  new English translation and adaptation by Tommy Lexen. Ducdame Ensemble introduces us to the woman behind Ibsen’s Nora; Benedictsson, who wrote under the pen name Ernst Ahlgren, was not only Ibsen’s inspiration but also Strindberg’s for Miss Julie. The Enchantment opens at HERE on July 6th, with previews beginning June 28th.
Dystopia is the normal atmosphere of an Ibsen play. It is poignantly a main event in the classic 1984. George Orwell’s novel in which Big Brother government controls its citizens has been turned into a play by the same name. The play by Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan was first performed in 2013 at England’s Nottingham Playhoouse.
1984 , a place where mind control involves convincing us that up is down, “freedom is slavery,” is now at Broadway’s newly renovated Hudson Theatre, with an opening on June 22nd, and starring Olivia Wilde and Tom Sturridge.
Posted in 2017 Tony Nominations, The Tony Awards, theater, Tony, Tony Awards, Tony nominee

Tony tonight!

Little Foxes

The Hamilton “phenomena,” I contend, can actually be blamed on The Producers.

The Mel Brooks musical was lauded, and expected to win a lot of the many nominations it received. It did. Susan Stroman had a lot more to work with in the zany plot, choreographing pensioners, than Andy Blankenbuehler did with his Founding Fathers. They could be expected to dance, perhaps, a sedate quadrille.  At any rate The Producers set a record in Tony wins, and everyone expects there will be another such production every year.

Best of luck to all the nominees who will be at the ceremonies tonight, June 11th at 8pm. Televised on CBS, with Kevin Spacey as the host, the Tony is always a good show.

Remember it really is an honor just to be named!

Posted in 2017 Tony Nominations, The Tony Awards, Tony, Tony Awards, Tony nominee

Tony fervor

h_HostAnnouncement_1341If you are a theater-goer and a New Yorker, it’s hard to resist the annual Tony ceremonies. It’s a dapper show, and even at 71 years, young and vibrant.

The broadcast on CBS at 8pm on June 11th will show you excerpts from shows you loved, and some from those you have yet to see.

Some reasons to watch

  1. James Earl Jones is to be honored for his Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre. That in and of itself is a lot to celebrate! I first saw him in The Great White Hope opposite Jane Alexander and most recently in You Can’t Take It With You. I had a chance to speak to him briefly since then when I encountered him as a fellow audience member at 33 Variations.
  2. There will be production numbers from the productions in contention for a Tony Best.
  3. It’s always a grand show. (See 2, and 1. above.)
  4. The talented Kevin Spacey will host.
  5. You’ve seen every play and/or musical nominated, and several that should have been but weren’t. You’re curious.
  6. You haven’t seen every play and/or musical nominated. You’re curious..
  7. This is how you plan for this summer’s theater-going. (See 2 above.)
Posted in 2017 Tony Nominations, drama, Pulitzer Prize winning play, Tony, Tony nominee

A More Perfect Union

Sweat 
Studio 54Work exhausts while giving the worker a sense of purpose and fulfillment. This is especially true of physical labor and its practitioners.

When Lynn Nottage’s characters in Sweat, at Studio 54 through November 19th, lose their jobs, and hit the picket lines, they are unmoored. Sweat is a working class story, of friends who share their lives on the factory floor and then relax at the bar over which Stan (James Colby) presides.

Sweat 
Studio 54The characters in Sweat include two young men, Chris (Khris Davis) and Jason (Will Pullen) and their mothers, Cynthia (Michelle Williams) and Tracey (Johanna Day) in scenes that go back and forth starting with Jason and Chris with their parole officer, Evan, (Lance Coadie Williams) in 2008, and going back to the bar in 2000. Rounding out the cast are Oscar (Carlo Albán), in a pivotal way, Brucie (John Earl Jelks) and Jessie (Alison Wright.)

Sweat 
Studio 54The actors all work hard to make us see them as factory laborers, and they succeed well. We engage in the life stories the characters tell but those seem distant.  We don’t connect not just because we don’t share their workplace experiences, but because they are more representatives than individuals to which we can relate. There is, however, a mystery set up at the beginning of Act One which we look to solve.

The play under Kate Whoriskey’s direction transferred from The Public Theatre in March. Johanna Day and Michelle Williams have been nominated for a Tony as Best Featured roles. Sweat is in contention as the Best Play for 2017.

Lynn Nottage is not afraid of hard work. For Sweat, Nottage researched the background for her scenario, as she has for her previous projects.  In her past plays she has honored her grandmother who toiled behind a sewing machine (Intimate Apparel, which won off-Broadway accolades in its 2004 run); in the equally well-received By The Way, Meet Vera Stark she looked at the roles of black women in Hollywood’s heydey. Nottage is a two-time Pulitzer Prize winning playwright; in fact the second win was with Sweat, which won her the prize this year. (Ruined won the 2009 Pulitzer. )

To learn more about and get tickets for Sweat, please visit www.sweatbroadway.com/

 

Posted in 2017 Tony Nominations, drama, musical, Tony predictions

Irksome

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Chris Cooper and Laurie Metcalf in a scene from A Doll’s House, Part 2 (c) Brigitte Lacombe

It’s an annual event that has critics and ordinary theater goers in a tizzy. The Tony Award  nominations are in, and this year’s contest (the 71st)  will be televised o n Sunday June 11th on CBS. It is at this ceremony that the results of all that Tony voting will be revealed. “And the winner is…” is a nerve-racking pronouncement. Equally irksome, and this is true year-to-year, are the actual nominations meted out with such parsimony.

All theater should be celebrated, yet the Tony committee chooses to withhold even a nod from some productions. Why? oh why? (BTW, a line from My Sister Eileen, the musical version of which, Wonderful Town, starring Rosalind Russell won the 1953 Tony.)

Nevermind, we just have to face what is coming at us like a freight train, and dig in for some knotty predictions. Horse races are not my thing, and my track record, as it were, for guessing who will get which prize is extremely poor.

Rinse and repeat

The smart money this 2017 season is on Groundhog Day, a musical I have not seen. Reports –from critics, and friends alike– (one a fan of Andy Karl who went to a performance during his absence due to injury, said it was still terrific)– are that this is the one to beat.

May I propose that in honor of Andrew Call’s valiant subbing in for Andy Karl, we add this minor adjustment to the proceedings: “And the Tony for best understudy in a leading role goes to….” (A category on the women’s side once taken by Barbra Streisand.)

The contestants as we know them

War Paint, another musical I skipped this season, has not one but two leading ladies vying for the Best. Truthfully, both Christine Ebersole and Patti LuPone are winners, although not necessarily this year. Ebersole has two Tonys as the Lead in 42nd Street (2001) and in Grey Gardens (2007); LuPone’s Tonys include a win for Evita (way back when, and wonderful; 1980) and for her Mama Rose in Gypsy (2008.) Both of these admirable divas have also had more than their fair share of nominations over the years.

5019Let me also admit to not having seen the other nominees for Best Musical, which are the wonderfully named Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812, the hyper-modern Dear Evan Hansen and charmingly off-beat Come From Away. As an outsider, as it were, I will make no further assumptions here. We really liked Bandstand, and it has had only limited recognition from the Tony folk. We were sure this first-time Broadway effort by veteran musicians Rob Taylor and Richard Oberacker deserved at least to be named.

 

The play’s the thing

Little FoxesOn the straight play side is where we have slightly better traction, although only slightly so. Of the nominees for Best Play, we have seen (and lovedA Doll’s House Part 2.  We have also seen the nominated revivals, The Little Foxes and Jitney, both in very fine productions; the revival of The Price was not among the plays mentioned. For what it’s worth, we are rooting for …Part 2, and for Little Foxes.

While on the subject of …Foxes, Tony could have given Cynthia Nixon (whom as it happens we saw in the lead) and Laura Linney (who split her lead and featured roles with Nixon) co-nominations in the Best Lead Actress category. Instead, Nixon gets the nod as Best Featured Actress, and Linney is in the running for the Best Lead.

The Glass Menagerie
Madison Ferris and Sally Field in The Glass Menagerie Photo by Julieta Cervantes

We have seen three of the nominated actress in both the Lead and Featured category., and this is a tough call. Sally Field has had her “they really like me” moment, and in fact was a very credible Amanda in my favorite Williams’ play; if I say I really really liked her, it is not to mock but to admire. Since I cannot speak to Linney’s interpretation of the steely Regina Giddens, and I can say that Laurie Metcalf was (as usual) fabulous as the re-imagined Nora in …Part 2, I will send a nod her way. This is in part based on only partial facts and in part based on a long-term admiration for her work. The entire cast in ..Part 2 has been nominated, and I would rally for each of them; the caveat is that this conclusion is also based on limited evidence.

The Men in question

We’ve seen five of the shows in which a male actor was nominated for a 2017 Tony Award. Two of them were leads. Denis Arndt gave an impressive, nuanced performance in the two-handed Heisenberg, (so named, I think, because of some relativity principal the play explored) opposite Mary-Louise Parker. Chris Cooper, Torvald in …Part 2 is definitely a worthy candidate; he is both hot and cold. Still, even with that, don’t feel like I know enough about the Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play.  For the Best Featured Actor, Richard Thomas is an estimable Horace Giddens in the revival of Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes. We definitely felt that Danny DeVito stole The Price from under his co-stars. John Douglas Thompson also shined in the excellent revival of August Wilson’s Jitney. From this vantage, I’m certainly unwilling to pick just one. Now, it is I who is proving tiresome. Oh, well.

In conclusion

May we suggest that you watch the ceremony, hosted by the multi-talented Kevin Spacey, on CBS on June 11th at 8pm. Cheer for the performances and productions you’ve seen; enjoy the fine show that Tony always provides; place your bets, and….