Posted in actors, ballet, balletic, circus, circus. vaudeville, dancers life, Lincoln Center

Personable

My intro to the NYCB Working Rehearsal included a docent telling us that one of the things she enjoyed about watching the dancers rehearse was that they reveal their personalities in the banter on the stage. In thinking about this, I realized that what I like to see on stage is a persona, not a personality.

DuffySq_fromSteps.jpg
Duffy Square, NYC. Photo © Tamara Beck

In this case, I witnessed, among other things, Robert Fairchild‘s easy charm (and of course those matinée idol looks I have often mentioned before) which has landed him on Broadway in the past. (And also in Paris and London where An American In Paris had its try-outs, as it were, pre-Palace Theatre in New York.) Fairchild is funny and always
very polite, which belies his perfectionism. He is completely professional and engaged in his dancing. His patter with Sterling Hyltin while waiting for the violinist, Arturo Delmoni was an agreeable look at his more private side, but what I expect to see in his penultimate performance as a Principal Dancer for NYCB at the Saturday matinée tomorrow is his absorption into the role in Duo Concertante. In other words, I will be mesmerized by the persona he projects, not the witty personality he clearly possesses. (Note, he reprises this role at the Sunday matinée.)

 


Not so hasty. We’re still here.

Marlise and JuliaT26H_008
Photo © Tamara Beck

Rumors that the Big Apple Circus had folded its tent for good appear to have been premature.

It may be that the demise of the multi-tent Barnum + Bailey makes this a winning holiday destination, and the only circus in town.

The Big Apple’s one ring approach was always a more kid-friendly way to present the events on this kind of stage anyway. Who can keep up with all the action in three rings?

On Thursday, The Big Apple was setting up for a late October opening at L.C. Its wagon were in the familiar place by Damrosch Park.


Note to the  storekeeper

Romeo_and_Juliet_(detail)_by_Frank_Dicksee
Frank Dicksee [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
The poster in the window says “Love Always Wins” and the posterboard is covered in post-its meant to prove this point.

The question I want to pose is have you considered how dire the ending is for Romeo and for Juliet, for instance? They are not the only star-crossed lovers in history– or in theater, but they set the tone for all those who have been failed by your all-encompassing motto.

“Love Sometimes Wins” might be a more apt if less emphatic statement.  Given the realities in many romances, the equivocal is a better way of expressing the hope that love carries and sometimes delivers.


Chick flicks

While on the subject of romance, I want to submit my favorite type of commentary– the list. In this case, it is a list of films in which women are powerful and empowered. Some of them are romantic in the traditional sense. Some take a right or left turn around the central proposition. Other lists I have shared include those in which ballets are interconnected, and have been meant as a year-end salute.

Here’s today’s list:

A League Of Their Own, sports and girls! 
Thelma and Louise
, girls in cars
Bull Durham, a girl–well, a woman and some ball players
Moonstruck, a love affair with two brothers and a woman, a full moon, etc etc etc
Alice, a woman on the edge of dementia
Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, a woman finds herself