Posted in also a film, based on a film, Dan LeFranc, dinner, Donald Marguiles, family drama, Festen, Jan Maxwell, John Lithgow, Neil Simon, Playwrights Horizons, The Music Box

Listing

 

via Daily Prompt: Disrupt List making is a habit. I have had a very hard time breaking myself of a disposition to compile and aggregate. There are times when the combinations on any given catalog serves to disrupt the order of things. Relationships can be tangential and serendipitous rather than strictly straightforward. This enumeration, for […]

Around the table in The Big Meal: David Wilson Barnes, Jennifer Mudge, Anita Gilette, Tom Bloom, Rachel Resheff. Photo by Joan Marcus.

via To throw ’em off the scent — Commenting:

This enumeration, for instance, pairs or doubles down on, very diverse films, yet there is a connection:

Add to this some other films and plays like The Big MealDinner for Shmucks or The Dinner Party (on Broadway in 2000 with Henry Winkler and the late Jan Maxwell and John Ritter et al) or the short-lived Festen, (also on Broadway and also at the Music Box) with Ali McGraw. The latter as I recall was a dark (both in lighting and atmosphere) play which, again, as I recall, was extremely interesting; it lasted just 49 performances.

 

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Posted in cabaret, comedy, dinner, musical theater, mystery, theater, theater songs

Dinner theater

Menu_American_Hotel_1862
Menu, American Hotel 1862: By Unknown – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45292074

Don’t disparage the chance to watch theater or hear music while enjoying a meal. It has the old time charm of the big band era. Thinking of dining while being entertained reminds me of ball gowns and tuxedos– in short it simply sounds elegant. Even the vulgar were properly attired in those days.

In our loosey goosey environs, the chances are that you are decked out in an elegant pair of shorts with a tucked in shirt. You order a burger, rather than prime rib, and beer rather than bubbly.

The show, too, may be less burlesque, drama, lounge act and cabaret than it might be one of those guess- who-dunnits from the murder mystery circuit. Don’t get me wrong, there is room for an amusing evening in which we wonder which of our neighbors stuck a knife in a sidekick’s back while we ate our fries! It just is not as highbrow or as uplifting as theater can sometimes be.  The dramatics and dramatization may be broader than on Broadway, too.

As for the dress code for the audience, well, I haven’t worn a gown to a show in a long time, if ever. I look to the costume designer to dress the actors in an inspirational way. I can aspire to high-falutin’, ya know.

Posted in African-American playwrights, dining, dinner, musical theater, Shakespeare, short play festival, theater

Dinner and a show OffBway Edition

Source: Dinner and a show:

With Off-Broadway Week 2-for-1 overlapping by a few days with Restaurant Week (the former starts Feb 1 and the latter ends Feb 2), you can take your sweetie out for an evening for around $100pp. Consider it nycgo.com‘s pre Valentine Day treat. We are making a few suggestions, not necessarily from the nycgo list.

Broadway and The Bard, produced by Amas Musical Theatre at The Lion on Theatre Row from January 28th through March 6th, unfortunately is not a 2-for-1 option this go round. This should not deter you from catching the wonderful stage and screen veteran Len Cariou anyway.  Combining his two great loves – Shakespeare and American Musical Comedy – into one rich and diverse tapestry; Cariou pairs classical soliloquies and sonnets with inventive musical numbers from the great repertoire of the Great White Way.

Two shows you will find in the 2-for list are Daddy Long Legs and Trip of Love. Both, like Broadway and the Bard, are conveniently located in the theater district where there are lots of $38pp dinner options– from Aureole’s Liberty Room to The View in the Marquis.

In midtown west, Maurice Hines’ Tappin’ Thru Life, at New World Stages has been added to the 2-fer list at nycgo. Grab a bite at 21 Club (Bar Room Pre-Theatre saves you $10 during Restaurant Week) and then head over toward 8th Avenue for the show.

Downtown, at the Kraine Theater there’s a The Fire This Time 10-Minute Play Festival directed by Nicole A. Watson that opened on January 18th and runs to February 6th. Like Broadway and the Bard, you won’t find this short play Festival on the 2-for-1 list. Go there and accompany your visit with a meal at say Root & Bone or Miss Lily’s 7A nearby.

The Festival, now in its 7th season, is a forum for emerging African-American playwrights whose talents and interests are represented in the short plays on the calendar. The program is diverse:

  • Pride by Tanya Everett explores how pride inhibits our relationships and ability to connect with another.
  • Keelay Gipson in Time in the Penn looks at how media affects mob mentality.
  • God Will Know The Difference by Jiréh Breon Holder looks at how identity, family and love can collide to shatter or unite.
  • In Hard Palate,  Roger Q. Mason wonders if the old stigmas about gays still apply in the age of dating apps and PrEP.
  • In Slavesperience by Stacey Rose, a progressive young white woman gets a better understanding of life in Black America from two professional slaves for her 30th birthday.
  • clarity by Korde Arrington Tuttle has a man questioning his impending marriage.
  • You Mine by Nia O. Witherspoon nightmarishly takes place in a senior-living facility in which an Alzheimer’s patient believes her caregiver is actually her slave.

The immersive theater event from the Third Rail Projects, The Grand Paradise is likely to have a long run if their earlier projects like Then She Fell is any indication. The Grand Paradise, previewing January 28th and selling tickets through the end of March in Bushwick,  takes you into a fountain of youth destined to quench all your desires.

Dine at some of the nearby Williamsburg establishments, like MP Taverna Brooklyn or Esh Restaurant and Bar as part of your evening.

The Foundry Theatre offers up an inspiring manifesto for transformative theatrical experiences. The Foundry Theatre’s O, Earth by Casey Llewellyn takes us back to Manhattan where it plays in the HERE space from January 23rd through February 20th.
O,Earth is an inclusively celebratory re-mix of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town as seen
through the lens of queer and trans culture and history.

In Soho, you’ll find the well-represented Dos Caminos chain offering Restaurant Week menus, as well as David Burke’s Kitchen, Mercer Kitchen and The Dutch, to name just a few, offer both lunch and dinner,  but most Restaurant Week participants exclude Saturday evenings.

 

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Posted in comedy, dining, dinner, drama, musical theater, theater

Dinner and a show

Book dinner and a show for ridiculous prices– no not those ridiculous prices, the ones that are considered moderate in this town!

Winter 2016 Restaurant Week and Broadway 2-for-1 coincide this season. The latter starts on January 19th and runs to February 5th, while Restaurant Week gives you an extra day to get ready on January 18th.

You can be sure that Hamilton did not make this list of 2-fors, but there are still plenty of big-ticket performances to see. 

This is a perfect time to catch An American in Paris, or The Color Purple, The King and I, or Beautiful, On Your Feet!, Something Rotten!, School of RockThe Humans or Phantom— to name just a few of the productions featured in the 2-fers. Dine before the show at Aureole, one of a couple of Bobby Van’s or The View at the Marquis for $38pp. If you hit a matinee and grab lunch it’s just $25pp at places like Victor’s Cuban Cafe, The Capital Grille (Times Square) Steakhouse, Butter Midtown or Barbetta. The list could go on, but you get our drift.

Everyone loves a bargain, so plan ahead for a table and your seats!

Visit http://www.nycgo.com/broadway-week to see what you haven’t seen yet. Go to http://www.nycgo.com/restaurant-week to snag a place at the table of your choice. Atlantic Grill, the Lincoln Ristorante and Boulud Sud are also participating in this winter’s Restaurant Week.