Posted in cabaret, comedy, dinner, musical theater, mystery, theater, theater songs

Dinner theater

Menu_American_Hotel_1862
Menu, American Hotel 1862: By Unknown – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45292074

Don’t disparage the chance to watch theater or hear music while enjoying a meal. It has the old time charm of the big band era. Thinking of dining while being entertained reminds me of ball gowns and tuxedos– in short it simply sounds elegant. Even the vulgar were properly attired in those days.

In our loosey goosey environs, the chances are that you are decked out in an elegant pair of shorts with a tucked in shirt. You order a burger, rather than prime rib, and beer rather than bubbly.

The show, too, may be less burlesque, drama, lounge act and cabaret than it might be one of those guess- who-dunnits from the murder mystery circuit. Don’t get me wrong, there is room for an amusing evening in which we wonder which of our neighbors stuck a knife in a sidekick’s back while we ate our fries! It just is not as highbrow or as uplifting as theater can sometimes be.  The dramatics and dramatization may be broader than on Broadway, too.

As for the dress code for the audience, well, I haven’t worn a gown to a show in a long time, if ever. I look to the costume designer to dress the actors in an inspirational way. I can aspire to high-falutin’, ya know.

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Shine

via Daily Prompt: Shine with thanks to Ben Huberman, The Daily Post for the inspiration

NoLateSeatingThose who crave the spotlight most often become entertainers. Their talent demands it. It is their calling to shine.

We applaud them, and in so doing bask in the glow of their accomplishment. They are center stage with the footlights on them, but we are illuminated by their performance.

Their light shines on us as they render and interpret and presnet their truths. Greater  performers shine brightest, and we shine brighter too.

Posted in 2-hander, emerging playwright, family drama, LEED-certified theater space, mystery, Željko Ivanek

"Slowgirl" exhilirates

“Slowgirl” at Claire Tow

So often it happens that bad things come from the exercise of poor judgement.

In Greg Pierce’s “Slowgirl,” produced by LCT3 at the new Claire Tow Theaer, and in a twice-extended run through August 5th, there is plenty of anguish to go around.

A tragedy brings Becky (Sarah Steele) to seek haven with her uncle Sterling (Željko Ivanek).

Like Becky, Sterling is harboring a secret.  The fast-talking Becky and her near-silent uncle are each complicit and share a sense of guilt for very different incidents in their lives.

Sarah Steele and Željko Ivanek Photo © Erin Baiano.

The mystery that is buried in “Slowgirl”unravels over four scenes at Sterling’s Costa Rican jungle home.
Sterling’s affection for his niece eventually gives him the impetus to move ahead.

Sarah Steele’s privileged 17-year old hides her pain in bravado. Hers is a smooth and seamless performance. In the diminutive and lovely Claire Tow Theater, its easy to see Željko Ivanek’s every raised eyebrow. His dismay as Becky chatters, blurting every inappropriate thought, is beautifully nuanced and perfectly timed.  Anne Kaufman’s direction allows the plot to unfold unexpectedly, keeping the enigmaiic center of “Slowgirl” alive throughout.

The sets, by Rachel Hauck, and sound, by Leah Gelpe, imaginatively invoke the bucolic tropical forest.  Their designs add to the simple exoticism of “Slowgirl.”

To get tickets and find out more about “Slowgirl” visit http://www.lincolncentertheater.org/.

Željko Ivanek Photo © Erin Baiano.

A word about the theater at LCT3:

The Claire Tow Theater sits atop the Vivian Beaumont and Mitzi Newhouse Theaters on the Lincoln Center Campus at 63rd and Broadway. The newly-built LEED-certified strucure is really extremely beautiful. It features along with its expertly designed 112 seat interior, a green roof; insulated glass and recycled materials were used in its construction.

The Claire Tow is a breathtaking space in which to showcase the works of emerging playwrights.