Posted in Amy Morton, Carrie Coon, Edward Albee, Madison Dirks, movie, Pam McKinnon, Steppenwolf, Tony, Tracy Letts, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Love survives in " Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virgiinia Woolf"



It’s a familiar scenario. Sometimes ringside seats come with that invitation to meet the senior
faculty.  
George (Tracy Letts) and Martha  (Amy Morton) are at it again in “Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” in a fiftieth anniversary revival through February 24th   at the Booth Theatre. Theirs is a combative love story.
Tracy Letts as George, Carrie Coon as Honey, Amy Morton as Martha being subdued by Madison Dirks as Nick and  in “Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? “ Photos by Michael Brosilow.

George and Martha duke it out in a battle royale over the course of one long and boozy night while Honey (Carrie Coon) and Nick (Madison Dirks) watch sometimes helplessly, sometimes actively. At first both Nick and Honey seem to be victims of the whirlwind that is Martha. While Honey seems oblivious, but Nick is an avid participant in the kind of games academics and battling marrieds play. 

“I would divorce you,” Martha tells George, ‘if you existed.” Their huffing and puffing definitely blows this house down.  This is an epic production of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.”

 
Tracy Letts as George, Amy Morton as Martha and Madison Dirks as Nick and Carrie Coon as Honey in “Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? “ Photos by Michael Brosilow.
Edward Albee, whose plays have won him a great deal of recognition– several Pulitzer, a couple of Tonys and one for Lifetime Achievement in The Theatre in 2005,–   has brought recriminations and vituperation to the level of art in  “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”.
In its inaugural production in 1962, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” won the Tony Award. This season, “Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” on Broadway  by way of Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company and directed by Pam MacKinnon, is on pace to once again grab some prizes.



For a more extended review of 
“Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” see http://www.vevlynspen.com/2012/11/edward-albees-whos-afraid-of-virginia.html
To find out more about “Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” visit http://virginiawoolfbroadway.com