Posted in theater, Tony Awards, Tony winner

TONY (W)rap

I was wrong
Hamilton came on strong

Not seven
But eleven

Statuettes for lighting,
Orchestrations, and fighting

Cast and Lin
All win

Hamilton‘s got a token
Record’s still unbroken

Hamilton– 16 nods, 11 wins– trails
The Producers– winning 12– prevails

Their twelve wins no one’s topped
Even with just 11, Ham can’t be stopped

Try and get a ticket to see it, now– no!
That’s okay, it’ll still be there when you do go


It’s an annual ritual at VevlynsPen.com to have me flail around guessing who the winner will be on TONY’s big night. I am often wrong, and occassionally right. Congratulations, for instance, to Roundabout’s She Loves Me for a best for sets designed by David Rockwell.

But the business of TONY is a double-edged sword. The awards celebration attracts audiences– Hamilton, we might point out, did not need the boost– andthose not getting an award are dubbed TONY losers. Yes, I know, a TONY nominee is not a loser, but if you don’t win it…. well you know. It is in the musical category that productions are particularly vulnerable. (Plays are on their own time-table; very rarely would one last even 500 performances, although it may find a revival every few years.)

Not every musical is as resilient as Something Rotten! which chugs along with only the one lonely TONY winner, Christian Borle, in its cast. From this year’s crop, On Your Feet!, the Emilio and Gloria Estefan musical, has its own special appeal, and is selling tickets through next April.

American Psycho The Musical succumbed before awards night. The luminous Bright Star is closing before the July 4th holiday on June 26th; as CBS news confirms, it did not win the awards needed to keep the public’s interest. Shuffle Along, or the Making of the Broadway Sensation of 1921, and all that Followed is telling its story through October 9th at this point. We’ll see if it gets a second wind if and when Audra McDonald returns from her intermission from the show.

Since I mentioned plays, aka non-musical ones, earlier, it is good to remember that Eclipsed might have had a longer run had it gotten more love from TONY. The Father, which won a TONY for Frank Langella’s star turn, closed on schedule on father’s day.The Humans, this year’s best play will stay open at least through the end of the year at the Helen Hayes.

What can the TONYs do to help Broadway more? Should we all ease up a little on thinking of a TONY win as the pinnacle of a production’s success? In other, maybe TONY should matter less and the play be the thing…..

Posted in theater

Who will win at the 2016 Tonys?

NoLateSeating

My TONY predictions are up for debate and parley: what do you think?
http://www.vevlynspen.com/2016/06/on-tonys-night-gonna-be-fight-with.html
Almost as soon as I make a guess as to which will win what, I want to hedge my bet. For instance, although I suggested that Savion Glover’s choreography for Shuffle Along, or… would win this year’s award, I am now leaning towards Sergio Trujillo’s congas in On Your Feet as prize winning for choreography.

In the musical categories, there is one big show to beat, but it is not the only contender. Without a doubt, however, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s brilliantly original Hamilton will be TONY’s BEST MUSICAL of 2016.

Lin-Manuel Miranda and the company of Hamilton. Photo © Joan Marcus
Lin-Manuel Miranda and the company of Hamilton. Photo © Joan Marcus

In other TONY expectations: look for Frank Langella to go home with a statuette for his performance in The Father. Likewise, The Humans looks good for Best Play, especially after its clinch at the Drama Desk Awards, although Danai Gurira’s timely and moving Eclipsed is also a nominee still in the running.

It is ever so tempting to blame the TONYs for early closings, but, honestly, American Psycho was steeped in red ink way before the nominations failed to acknowledge the hard work of its star, Benjamin Walker, or to credit the ingenuity of its creative team, particularly composer/lyricist, Duncan Sheik. TONY nomonations–or lack thereof– are not always the only problem productions face. Plays, especially “difficult” ones like Gurira’s, are often under-appreciated by theater-goers. (AP closed last week, and Eclipsed is scheduled to on June 19th. On Your Feet can carry on without substantial nominations and just its fan based audiences.)

My track record in guessing TONY finalists is not very good. So, let’s just hope for a lovely day and may the best play and players win!

 

 

Posted in drama, family drama

Father’s Day

Not being able to trust one’s senses is disorienting.

The Father starring Frank Langella as André, with Kathryn Erbe as Anne. Brian Avers as Pierre and Charles Borland as Man. Pictured Hannah Cabell as Laura with Langella. Also featuring Kathleen McNenny as Woman Florian Zeller Playwright and Translated by Christopher Hampton; Directed by Doug Hughes

It could be said that Florian Zeller’s new play, The Father, at MTC’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre through June 12th, is about a man whose disorientation is the reason he can’t trust his senses.

Andre (Frank Langella) rages against his diminishing capacities. He recalls and imagines things that have not happened and cannot remember those that have.

Zeller’s conceit is to immerse the viewer in Andre’s dissonances. Characters, whom we may not recognize, appear, furniture and paintings disappear. (The elegant set is by Scott Pask.)

Strobe lights flicker between scenes. (Jim Steinmeyer is the illusion consultant and Donald Holder is responsible for the lighting and its effects.) Christopher Hampton’s translation makes excellent use of the ellipses, leaving thoughts suggested and unsaid.

Frank Langella as André and Kathryn Erbe as Anne in a scene from Florian Zeller’s The Father. Photo © Joan Marcus

Andre bullies his daughter, Anne (Kathryn Erbe) and bellows at home aides. He can be charming and flirtatious, as he is with one aide, Laura (Hannah Cabell), to whom he takes a liking.  Andre is enfeebled by his growing dementia, but his leonine command is not weakened. There is no sentimentality in The Father, a clear-eyed portrait of a man accustomed to having his way as he loses his grip.

 

Anne knows that her father is a difficult man, and while she is saddened by the state he’s in, she is also tense and angry. Erbe conveys these emotions with complete equanimity. Andre’s collapse is watched over by Anne, her boyfriend Pierre (Brian Avers), an unnamed Man (Charles Borland) and Woman (Kathleen McNenny). Most of the people surrounding and supporting Andre are calm against the storm of his tantrums.

The Father is a very good play, but Langella’s performance makes it a great one. In one moment, his Andre is endearing, in the next unsettled, then intimidating. Andre, likely projecting his own tendency to browbeat, feels menaced by Pierre and by the Man.

Doug Hughes has directed this flawless cast so that we, the audience, internalize the emotions that Andre feels in The Father. Langella’s striking portrayal could so easily slip into overwrought melodrama, but Langella keeps Andre genuine and real.

Langella may be due for another Tony for this strong sinuous performance. Don’t let the strength of this central character distract from the excellent cast assembled here.

To learn more about Florian Zeller’s The Father, visit thefatherbroadway.com/